2018/03/13 – 2018/03/13

141 Catherine St.

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Whether you are doing computer forensics in a corporate compliance environment, or as part of a criminal investigations, there is a very good chance that browser artefacts will form part of your analysis. Google Chrome is currently the most popular browser. In this session, we will look at some valuable browser artefacts you can extract from Google Chrome to help you in your analysis.

Presenter Bio

Jacques Boucher is the national manager of criminal investigation’s digital forensics services at the Canada Revenue Agency. Jacques is a retired police officer with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police where he spent the last 12 of his 25 year career as a computer forensic investigator. Jacques spent three years as a senior computer forensic instructor with the Canadian Police College’s Technological Crime Learning Institute where he oversaw the development of their Internet Evidence Analysis Course and taught the browser forensics sessions. Jacques still returns as a guest instructor to teach Google Chrome forensics. Jacques recently graduated from University College of Dublin with a MSc in Forensic Computing and Cybercrime Investigation, where for his dissertation he developed a computer forensic framework to help computer forensic analysts attribute applications artifacts from an application with syncing features, such as Google Chrome, to the device being analyzed. Jacques will be presenting his dissertation at DFRWS-EU being held in Italy later in March 2018, and his article on the framework will be published in Elsevier’s Digital Investigations journal, issue 24S.


  • 5:30 – 6:15 PM Registration, Networking, Cash Bar and Grill
  • 6:15 – 6:20 PM Introduction of Speaker
  • 6:20 – 7:20 PM Presentation
  • 7:20 – 7:30 PM Question Period
  • 7:30 PM Closing remarks


Members: free, included in your annual dues

Non-Members: $15.00